Meet My School

Meet My School. #Back2School. © 2017 UNRWA


Palestine refugee children’s access to a quality basic education remains under constant threat as a result of challenging and abnormal circumstances. In Syria, six years of conflict have rendered over 70 per cent of UNRWA schools inoperative, due to damage to school infrastructure, access restrictions or the need for schools to be used as collective centres sheltering internally displaced persons. In Gaza, the blockade and repeated hostilities have had a devastating impact on the well-being of Palestine refugee children and also resulted in significant damage to educational facilities and critical infrastructure. In the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, 50 years of occupation – characterized by security operations, access and movement restrictions, settler violence and violence near schools – has hindered the access to education and human development of children and youth. In Lebanon, Palestine refugee camps have been marked by clashes and UNRWA schools have been physically damaged and used by armed factions, while legal restrictions make it difficult for Palestine refugees to access secondary schools and employment opportunities. In Jordan, many Palestine refugee students study in overcrowded classrooms and face high levels of poverty at home.

In spite of these barriers to education, Palestine refugee children across the region and their families continue to value education and strive for excellence. This is also thanks to UNRWA schools that provide a sense of security, stability and normalcy despite the circumstances these children live in. Here UNRWA strives to ensure that its education programme is able to respond to the diverse needs of Palestine refugee children, not least with the innovative and ground-breaking Education in Emergencies (EiE) programme.

Psychosocial support is also provided to help mitigate the impact of the daily challenges student may face, through school counsellors and additional opportunities to engage in recreational activities.

The success of UNRWA in continuing to provide quality education, even in what may be dire circumstances, is made possible through the generous contribution of donors such as the EU, the United States, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, among others, in support of the UNRWA programme budget, which also finances the education programme.


 

Nohad dreams of starting a beauty salon business. With the support of the European Union, and through her hands-on courses at the UNRWA Siblin Training Centre in Lebanon, Nohad is already halfway there!


Take a tour of Qalqilya Basic School in Damascus, Syria with Rula. Due to the ongoing conflict, children need a space that provide a sense of normalcy. Rula sees her UNRWA school as a safe place. In Syria, six years of conflict have rendered over 70 per cent of UNRWA schools inoperative, due to damage to school infrastructure, access restrictions or the need for schools to be used as collective centres sheltering internally displaced persons.


Take a tour with Mariam and Tala who are excited to start studying in the new Jabal al-Taj Preparatory Girls and Boys School in Jordan. The school replaced old, overcrowded, rented school premises that Mariam attended last year. UNRWA schools, along with the psychosocial support programme, provide students with stability despite their circumstances.


Take a tour of the Fara’ Basic Girls’ School in the city of Nablus with 8-year-old Dana and Rital. Despite 50 years of occupation in the West Bank, Palestine refugee students value education and strive for excellence. UNRWA schools provide a sense of security for those students living under occupation.


Take a tour of the New Gaza Basic Boys’ School with Ahmad and Yazan. Living under a 10-year blockade, Ahmad and Yazan find a sense of security and normalcy in attending UNRWA schools. The blockade and repeated hostilities have had a devastating impact on Palestine refugee children and resulted in significant damage to educational facilities and critical infrastructure. However, Palestine refugee students continue to thrive.


UNRWA thanks all donors for their contributions to its education programme